Top 5 Best Places to Visit in Zimbabwe – 2021

Zimbabwe is an excellent tourist destination. Zimbabwe is a Southern African nation. It was the richest country in Africa only 20 years ago. With the economy in shambles, it is an excellent time to come since resorts and hotels are more cheaper than usual, plus it is quite lovely. The Victoria Falls’ mile-wide curtain of water plunges deep into the Zambezi Gorge, generating a cloud of mist visible for up to 20 miles. They may be viewed on a short trip from Botswana or South Africa, but visitors will miss out on several intriguing locations.

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Hwange National Park

It is located in the country’s northwest, right off the main route connecting Bulawayo and Victoria Falls. The park is home to approximately 100 distinct animal species and over 400 different bird species. It is one of Africa’s few big elephant sanctuaries, having around 30,000 elephants. Hwange National Park is Zimbabwe’s largest natural reserve.

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Poachers murdered a big number of African elephants with cyanide after poisoning their waterhole, it was revealed in October 2013. According to conservationists, this is the greatest unlawful killing of animals in Southern Africa in the last 25 years. To ascertain the severity of the deaths, two aerial surveys were conducted, with the first survey identifying 19 carcasses and the second scan identifying 84 carcasses.

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Three poachers were apprehended, arrested, prosecuted, convicted, and punished. All high game and elephant trafficking crimes now have a compulsory 9-year jail term, and the supply chain is now under scrutiny.

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Matobo Hills National Park

This little park near Bulawayo, often known as Matopos, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003 for its interesting natural characteristics and animals. The Matobo National Park is located at the heart of the Matobo or Matopos Hills, a region of granite kopjes and forested valleys.

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Over 2 billion years ago, granite was driven to the surface, resulting in polished “whaleback dwalas” and shattered kopjes scattered with rocks and intermingled with thickets of plants. Matopo/Matobo is a perversion of the Tshivenda word “matombo,” which means “stones” in Tshivenda. The Lozwi, Kalanga’s forefathers, gave it its name. Officially, Matobo National Park includes Lake Matopos Recreational Park; the park is located in the southern Africa bushveld ecoregion.

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Mana Pools National Park

Mana Pools National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site located south of the Zambezi River in northern Zimbabwe. It is a secluded region that welcomes a small number of safari enthusiasts with an abundance of elephants, hippos, lions, antelopes, and other creatures, as well as over 350 bird species, amid breathtaking scenery.

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It is a section of Zimbabwe’s lower Zambezi River where the flood plain transforms into a vast stretch of lakes following each monsoon season. As the lakes progressively dry up and recede, the location attracts a significant number of big animals in search of water, making it one of Africa’s most famous game-viewing areas. In 1984, the park was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site together with the Sapi Safari Area and the Chewore Safari Area.

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Victoria Falls

The Victoria Falls, Victoria Falls is one of Africa’s most popular tourist destinations and one of the world’s most stunning waterfalls. Victoria Falls is a waterfall on the Zambezi River in southern Africa that is home to various rare animals and plants. It is located on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe and has a width of 1,708m, making it one of the world’s largest waterfalls.

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On 16 November 1855, the Scottish missionary and explorer David Livingstone was the first European to observe the falls from what is now known as Livingstone Island, one of two land masses in the middle of the river, directly upstream from the falls on the Zambian coast. Although Livingstone titled his sighting after Queen Victoria, the Sotho language term, Mosi-oa-Tunya, or “The Smoke That Thunders,” is still widely used. Both names are formally recognised on the World Heritage List.

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As a result of the frequent shower, Livingstone also mentioned an ancient name, Seongo or Chongwe, which means “The Place of the Rainbow.” The surrounding Zambian national park is called Mosi-oa-Tunya, whereas the Zimbabwean national park and town are also called Victoria Falls.

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Nyanga National Park

Nyanga National Park is located in Zimbabwe’s Eastern Highlands to the north. It was one of the first national parks established in Zimbabwe, and it comprises the highest terrain in the country, as well as lush hills and perennial rivers. The majority of the landscape is undulating downland, occasionally sparsely forested, with elevations ranging from 1,800 to 2,593 metres.

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Mount Nyangani, Zimbabwe’s highest peak, is located in the park’s centre, while Mutarazi Falls, Zimbabwe’s tallest waterfall, is located in the park’s south. On its southern border, Nyanga National Park encompasses the old Mutarazi Falls National Park. The original park boundaries extended north of the present park boundary, past Udu Dam, along the east bank of the Nyangombe River.

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Amongst animal enthusiasts, the park is well renowned for its numbers of blue duiker and Samango monkeys. Outside of the Eastern Highlands, neither animal can be found. The endangered Inyangani river frog lives in rocky, fast-flowing streams in the montane grassland. Nyanga National Park can provide visitors a unique vacation experience.

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