Things to See When You Visit Belgium – 2021

Belgium is a lovely nation on the North Sea coast of the Benelux region. Belgium is located at a crossroads in Western Europe. Belgium is a heavily populated country attempting to manage the competing needs of urbanisation, transportation, and industry, as well as commercial and intensive agriculture. It imports a lot of raw materials and exports a lot of finished goods, especially to other EU members.

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Known mostly for its position in European Union administration, the little country of Belgium may surprise you with its rich and beautiful past. It has a variety of fascinatingly old cities that are rich in mediaeval and Art Nouveau architecture and are well-known for their long histories in the arts, fashion, and fine dining. If you’ve seen it all, the Belgian countryside has everything from sandy beaches to the thickly wooded hills and ridges of the Ardennes.

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Brussels

The country’s dynamic capital, is a contemporary world metropolis with a distinctively cosmopolitan flavour. Its European Quarter blends huge post-modern structures with spectacular ancient landmarks, such as the World Heritage-listed Grand Place, which is bordered by guildhouses and the Gothic town hall.

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Laken Castle and the enormous St. Michael and St. Gudula Cathedral, devoted to the city’s patron saints, are well worth a visit. The Royal Palace is a newer but no less impressive edifice. The Atomium, a spectacular steel building and remnant of the 1958 World’s Fair, is one of the city’s most recognised sights. Despite all of these stunning attractions, many visitors’ favourite is a little bronze fountain in the figure of a peeing boy: the mysterious Manneken Pis.

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Bruges

Bruges is one of the most well-known cities in Belgium. Much of the magnificent architecture that emerged during the town’s Golden Age, about the 14th century, has been preserved, and the historic centre is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The 13th century bell tower, where the carillonneur still rings the bells on a regular basis, is one of its most recognisable monuments.

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Bruges is a renowned tourist destination with a plethora of other notable sites, and it may become a little congested over the holidays. Then there’s Ghent, which was once one of Northern Europe’s richest cities. Despite being larger and busier than Bruges, its outstanding mediaeval architecture can easily rival.

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World Heritage Sites include its beguinages, belfry, and old cloth hall. Visit Antwerp, the country’s current hub for the Belgian fashion, partying, arts, and diamond scenes. Nonetheless, the city’s ageless old centre is right up there with the others, possessing one of the country’s most beautiful churches. Other nice places with interesting sites are Leuven, which has the world’s oldest Catholic university still in operation, Mechelen, Liège, and Beringen, which has a picturesque mining estate.

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The rough hills of the Ardennes, with their dense woods, caves, and cliffs, are ideal for hiking, bicycling, and camping. They are home to wild boar, deer, and lynx, as well as a variety of friendly communities, castles, and other significant landmarks.

Some of the greatest choices are the spectacular caverns of Han-sur-Lesse, the castle of Bouillon, and the contemporary Labyrinth of Barvaux. Namur is a fantastic starting point for exploring the Ardennes and has some interesting sites of its own. The city is attractively situated along the rivers Meuse and Sambre, and the old fortress offers a fantastic perspective of the city.

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Limburg

Limburg, a Belgian province, is one of Europe’s best-kept secrets. It has a well-deserved reputation as a bicycle haven. This province has 2,000 kilometres of mostly car-free riding paths, allowing for many days of cycling enjoyment through diverse landscapes. Limburg’s cycling system of numbered junctions, which has been duplicated all over the globe, takes you through the most beautiful landscapes – from junction to junction. Haspengouw’s undulating hills, with their traditional towns, castles, and endless orchards.

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The flat Maasland, where you may ride along the Maasdijk and take a free bicycle ferries to the Netherlands. Voeren, with its high slopes, streams, and exquisite fall scenery. The Campine, with its brightly coloured canals, purple heathland, pine trees, panoramic vistas, and ponds. Limburg is particularly widely renowned for its castles, abbeys, and cities that are rich in historical relics, as well as its coal mining heritage.

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Belgians produced a number of world-renowned masters of art, and their passion for the arts is still reflected in the variety of fine arts museums that exist today. Among the best examples are the Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts in Brussels and the Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten in Antwerp.

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Belgians, on the other hand, like museums, having over 80 in the city alone. They exhibit everything from history and folklore to business and technology, in addition to the arts. Because some of the worst combat of both World Wars occurred on Belgian soil, there are several memorials and museums devoted to those sad times, as well as some sobering military cemeteries.

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