Things to Do When you Visit Norway

Norway (Norge) is most renowned for the intricate and deep fjords that run down its west coast, which extends from the North Sea near Denmark and Scotland further into the Arctic Ocean. In Norway, tourism is periodic, with much more than 50 percent of all visitors arriving between May and August. The diverse landscapes that stretch over the Arctic Circle are among Norway’s prime attractions.

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It is well-known for its larger screen coastline, highlands, ski resorts, lakes, and forests. Every year, hundreds of thousands of international visitors visit Western and Northern Norway’s fjords, highlands, and waterfalls. Much of Norway’s natural beauty remains untouched, attracting a large number of hikers and skiers.

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Norway is well-known for its abundance of fjords. Nærøyfjord and Geiranger are two of Norway’s most famous fjords. One-day Norway in a Nutshell package on a single ticket from Oslo or Bergen into the mountains, including a boat ride through the fjords, is an excellent introduction to Norway. You may take breaks at many fascinating cabins for strolling or just enjoying the scenery, and you can also rent a mountain bike during part of the route.

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Flåmsbana, a 20km railway which is one of the steepest in the world, is among the centerpieces of the ‘Norway in a Nutshell‘ package. On your journey, you’ll pass through magnificent mountains, rivers, valleys, waterfalls, and other scenic areas.

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Going on a guided trip is another excellent opportunity to experience and learn about Norway. Norway Trips offers a variety of excursions, ranging from sightseeing to hiking. A local guide will take you to the most fascinating and picturesque locations and will teach you everything about the fjords and mountains, as well as the history and culture of the area you are visiting.

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The Northern Lights and The Midnight Sun

Troms is an excellent location for seeing the aurora borealis or northern lights. Tromso is especially worth a visit in the summer to view the midnight sun. The length of the Polar Day period is determined by how far north you are. The longer the time lasts and the sooner it starts, the farther north you travel.

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The North Cape, Bod, and Lofoten are excellent places to see the Midnight Sun. The prevalence and severity of the Northern Lights are correlated with high levels of solar sunspots, which occur at roughly eleven-year intervals.

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Hiking

Norway’s vast nature offers many hiking possibilities, ranging from simple hikes in Oslo’s city forest to mountain climbs in Jotunheimen or Troms. A handful of places have been designated as national parks, but the majority of the country is equally appealing and accessible to the general population.

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Travelers in Norway have a right to access, which means they may camp freely in most locations for quite a couple days as far as they are not on the cultivated ground but are at least 150m away from residential areas and farms. Leave no sign of your presence and recycle your trash.

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Den Norske Turistforening maintains numerous professional and self-service mountaintop cabins in Norway, designates mountain trails, provides maps and trail information, sightseeing tours, and a variety of additional services to mountain walkers. Mountainous regions are attractive amongst Norwegians as well as visitors. Visit Galdhøpiggen, Norway’s highest peak, or go on a musk ox safari in Dovrefjell.

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For maps, avoid Google Maps, which has limited coverage of Norway, and instead use the national planning firm’s norgeskart.no website, which corresponds with their outstanding printed trekking maps. Water from bigger streams, rivers, and lakes is always safe to drink. Unless absolutely essential, avoid drinking swamp water and water from marshy areas.

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Skiing

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Cross-country and alpine skiing are winter sports activities, and the biggest regions, such as Trysil, Hafjell, and Hemsedal, can rival the Alps. Telemark skiing is also popular. (This is the origin of cross-country skiing.) Other significant ski areas are Voss, Geilo, and Oppdal.

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There are many big parks in the Oslo area that are excellent for cross-country skiing. There are alpine ski facilities in Stryn, Galdhpiggen, and Folgefonna that are only open in the summer, presenting new possibilities for alpine skiing in t-shirts and shorts

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Cycling

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A bicycle may be rented almost everywhere in Norway. Cycling routes are typically found around larger cities; such trips may be found at Cycle tourism in Norway. Some roads and tunnels are off-limits to bicycles because they are dangerous; Some municipal landfills may have a designated area where you may pick up abandoned bicycles (and other items) for free. Used bicycles are sometimes available in charity thrift shops.

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