Best Known Unique Wildlife of Australia

The flora and fauna of Australia are unique to the island, as a consequence of the island’s long isolation from the rest of the planet over millions of years. A wide collection of marsupials (mammals with a pouch) and monotremes (three-toed creatures) may be found in Australia (mammals that lay eggs).

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The kangaroo (Australia’s national emblem) and the koala are just a few of the animals that have become symbols of the country. A trip to Australia would be incomplete if you did not get the opportunity to view some of these creatures in their native habitat.

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Wildlife parks and zoos can be found in every major city, but if you are travelling through smaller towns like Mildura or Mogo, or if you are staying on Hamilton Island, be sure to visit the animal parks there as well. If you are in South Australia, pay a visit to the Warrawong Fauna Sanctuary, or if you are in Sydney, pay a visit to Taronga Zoo, where you may see koalas with the finest view in the world.

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Kangaroos and wallabies may be found in national parks all throughout Australia, including the Northern Territory. There will be no kangaroos hopping down the street in Central Sydney, but they are prevalent on the fringes of most metropolitan places throughout the rest of the country. In addition, there is a well-known group that has set up residence on the grounds of the University of the Sunshine Coast in Brisbane, Australia.

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Wombats and echidnas are also prevalent, but they are more difficult to see owing to their camouflage and tunnelling abilities. On Kangaroo Island, you’ll see a lot of echidnas.

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Despite the fact that koalas can be found in forests all across Australia, they are famously difficult to detect. Simply wandering about gazing up into the branches of trees will almost always result in you falling over a tree root.

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Raymond Island, located near Paynesville in Victoria, has a vibrant and pleasant populace, which is best seen during the daytime. On the Otway Coast, along the Great Ocean Road, and even in the National Park walk at Noosa on the Sunshine Coast, you have a decent chance of seeing one.

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If you want to see a platypus, look for it in reedy running streams with soft riversides in Victoria, Southern New South Wales, and the extreme southern area of Queensland. They are most often spotted between twilight and morning, and you have to be lucky to view one. Platypus reserves may be found at Bombala and Delegate in New South Wales, as well as Emu Creek near Skipton, which is just outside of Ballarat.

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Australia is home to a very varied array of bird species

In Australia, cockatoos belong to a family of birds that may be found all across the continent, even in urban areas. Even in central Sydney, the famous sulphur-crested cockatoo, as well as galahs and corellas, may be seen in their thousands on the streets. Cockatiels in the wild are rare and only found in a few isolated rural regions. Early in the morning or late in the evening are the best times to witness this phenomenon.

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Australian Magpies may be found all across the continent, and they are particularly prevalent in suburban areas. However, beware of swooping magpies!

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Kookaburras are another iconic species that may be found across Australia, although they are not as numerous as they once were. They are especially widespread on and around the Great Dividing Range.

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Emu is more numerous in central Australia than in other parts of the country. If you go to Currawinya National Park in Australia’s outback, you will almost definitely come across some. It is considerably less frequent to see emus in the wild, and they are usually only seen as a distant cloud of dust when travelling on roads in interior rural regions.

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